The Baseball Zone Blog

Kevin Hussey | Jan 15, 2015 3:26:55 PM

How Aspiring College Baseball Prospects Can Learn From Learning

High school is obviously very important in terms of creating opportunities and giving yourself a chance to have a good job in the future. The misconception of high school is that its purpose is for kids to learn information you can use in your future. What kids really learn in high school is how to develop a work ethic while learning how to take information and apply it. Essentially what you learn in high school is how to learn. School gives kids the opportunity to constantly be challenged and deal with adversity. Every student has had difficulty either with a subject or understanding a concept throughout their education. This adversity is relatable to many aspects of life, including baseball. There has never been a college baseball player that went their whole career without having to persevere through some type of difficulty. The path to success that young athletes and students endure is similar in concept. Each year the difficulty and competitiveness increases, while getting closer to your goal. In academics and athletes once you move on to the next level, the previous year becomes irrelevant .For both students and athletes, the past can give you opportunity but the future will determine your success.

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Topics: college, college baseball, college baseball recruiting, college baseball scholarship, high school baseball

Kevin Hussey | Oct 16, 2014 3:13:00 PM

How to Make a Recruiting Video for College Baseball Coaches

If you’re looking to play college baseball and you plan on emailing coaches, it will always help to send a video of yourself to the coach. NCAA, NJCAA and NAIA coaches are always looking for new players and sending a video of yourself can be very beneficial for them. It’s important to have a video with useful footage so college coaches have an idea of your skill level.

Pitcher's video

A pitcher's video should provide coaches with footage of you throwing from the windup and stretch. When creating the video you should shoot about 5-6 pitches from both sides of the mound (back side & front side) as well as the back and front (behind you and behind the catcher/target). You should throw all your pitches at least 3-4 times. This will give the coach an idea of what your strengths are and what you need to improve on. When shooting from the front and behind, try to have the result of the pitch in focus so the coach can see your accuracy. It’s not necessary to have a radar gun in the video but telling the coach how hard you throw would help. The coach will have an idea from your video what your velocity may be. The length of the video should be no longer than 3-4 minutes.

Catcher’s video

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Topics: recruiting, college, ncaa, college baseball, college baseball recruiting, college baseball scholarship, college recruiting strategy, naia, junior college, juco, recruiting video, college baseball coaches

Kevin Hussey | Oct 4, 2014 6:30:00 AM

Quality, Scholly #'s & Travel - Info For College Baseball Prospects

College baseball prospects looking to play college baseball have a long list of options they can choose from in regards to which school best suits them. There are over 1600 schools in the US that offer a baseball program. The different types of schools include NCAA D1, D2, D3, NJCAA (Junior College) DI, D2, D3, and NAIA D1, D2. All of these schools except for the NCAA DIII and NJCAA DIII can offer you athletic scholarships. Although DIII schools cannot offer athletic scholarships, they can still give you academic money to help with tuition costs. All athletes who are not on scholarship are considered walk-ons. A walk-on is an athlete who is on the roster but will not receive any athletic money from the school. There are two types of walk on athletes - preferred walk-ons and regular walk-ons. A preferred walk on is an athlete that is recruited by the schools coach but there is no scholarship money available. Regular walk-ons are students at the school that will have the opportunity to try out for the team during walk-on tryouts.

When beginning to navigate the options of playing college baseball, there are a number of things to consider that don't necessarily hold true from one level to another. Here is a quick synopsis of a few of those things at the NCAA DI, DII and NAIA levels.

Division I

There are just under 300 division I baseball programs in the United States.

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Topics: scholarship, ncaa, college baseball, college baseball recruiting, college baseball scholarship, naia, mlb, aaa

Kevin Hussey | Sep 27, 2014 6:30:00 AM

Academics & Playing College Baseball - 3 Areas To Stay On Top Of

Academics for a college baseball player can vary depending on their school and major. All students’ schedules will be different but there are rules that every student must follow. It’s important to be proactive with your academics and understand all the guidelines to maintaining your eligibility while playing college baseball.

Credit Hours

To be a collegiate athlete in the US you have to be considered a full-time student. In order to be a full-time student you must take 12 credit hours per semester (some exceptions). A credit hour is generally measured as the amount of hours a student will be in the class room. For example if you take a class that is 3 hours per week, you will receive 3 credit hours at the end of the semester. In order to graduate college, a typical degree will take a minimum of 120 credit hours. Students will be assigned an academic adviser that will likely set up a graduation plan to determine how long it will take to finish their degree.

For example…..

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Topics: college, ncaa, college baseball, college baseball recruiting, college baseball scholarship, naia, njcaa, academic eligibility, credit hours

Kevin Hussey | Sep 24, 2014 6:00:00 AM

3 Reasons Why Canadians Need to Consider Junior College Baseball

For Canadian athletes looking to play college baseball, junior colleges (or "JUCO"'s) are often disregarded or seen as a backup plan for an aspiring collegiate baseball player. The reason for this is many people are unaware of the benefits a junior college can provide. Junior college baseball is often the best option for Canadians and athletes and parents need to understand why it may be the best fit.

  1. The BaseballJunior college baseball is highly competitive and is often where top prospects go to upgrade their draft status and develop their skills. The benefit of junior college is that top prospects are draft eligible after their first year and second years. NCAA baseball players are prohibited from the draft until after their third year of eligibility. For players who are not top prospects, junior college gives athletes the chance to compete at the college level but not compete against juniors and seniors (as they are only two year programs). Often times when a baseball player goes to a university straight out of high school, he is overmatched physically. This can often lead to a student sitting on the bench for a couple years while they mature. Not only do junior colleges allow students to mature physically but it allows them to develop mentally as well. 

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Topics: recruiting, college, ncaa, college baseball, college baseball recruiting, college baseball scholarship, college recruiting strategy, junior college, juco, njcaa

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