The Baseball Zone Blog

Kevin Hussey | Oct 16, 2014 3:13:00 PM

How to Make a Recruiting Video for College Baseball Coaches

If you’re looking to play college baseball and you plan on emailing coaches, it will always help to send a video of yourself to the coach. NCAA, NJCAA and NAIA coaches are always looking for new players and sending a video of yourself can be very beneficial for them. It’s important to have a video with useful footage so college coaches have an idea of your skill level.

Pitcher's video

A pitcher's video should provide coaches with footage of you throwing from the windup and stretch. When creating the video you should shoot about 5-6 pitches from both sides of the mound (back side & front side) as well as the back and front (behind you and behind the catcher/target). You should throw all your pitches at least 3-4 times. This will give the coach an idea of what your strengths are and what you need to improve on. When shooting from the front and behind, try to have the result of the pitch in focus so the coach can see your accuracy. It’s not necessary to have a radar gun in the video but telling the coach how hard you throw would help. The coach will have an idea from your video what your velocity may be. The length of the video should be no longer than 3-4 minutes.

Catcher’s video

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Topics: recruiting, college, ncaa, college baseball, college baseball recruiting, college baseball scholarship, college recruiting strategy, naia, junior college, juco, recruiting video, college baseball coaches

Kevin Hussey | Oct 4, 2014 6:30:00 AM

Quality, Scholly #'s & Travel - Info For College Baseball Prospects

College baseball prospects looking to play college baseball have a long list of options they can choose from in regards to which school best suits them. There are over 1600 schools in the US that offer a baseball program. The different types of schools include NCAA D1, D2, D3, NJCAA (Junior College) DI, D2, D3, and NAIA D1, D2. All of these schools except for the NCAA DIII and NJCAA DIII can offer you athletic scholarships. Although DIII schools cannot offer athletic scholarships, they can still give you academic money to help with tuition costs. All athletes who are not on scholarship are considered walk-ons. A walk-on is an athlete who is on the roster but will not receive any athletic money from the school. There are two types of walk on athletes - preferred walk-ons and regular walk-ons. A preferred walk on is an athlete that is recruited by the schools coach but there is no scholarship money available. Regular walk-ons are students at the school that will have the opportunity to try out for the team during walk-on tryouts.

When beginning to navigate the options of playing college baseball, there are a number of things to consider that don't necessarily hold true from one level to another. Here is a quick synopsis of a few of those things at the NCAA DI, DII and NAIA levels.

Division I

There are just under 300 division I baseball programs in the United States.

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Topics: scholarship, ncaa, college baseball, college baseball recruiting, college baseball scholarship, naia, mlb, aaa

Kevin Hussey | Sep 27, 2014 6:30:00 AM

Academics & Playing College Baseball - 3 Areas To Stay On Top Of

Academics for a college baseball player can vary depending on their school and major. All students’ schedules will be different but there are rules that every student must follow. It’s important to be proactive with your academics and understand all the guidelines to maintaining your eligibility while playing college baseball.

Credit Hours

To be a collegiate athlete in the US you have to be considered a full-time student. In order to be a full-time student you must take 12 credit hours per semester (some exceptions). A credit hour is generally measured as the amount of hours a student will be in the class room. For example if you take a class that is 3 hours per week, you will receive 3 credit hours at the end of the semester. In order to graduate college, a typical degree will take a minimum of 120 credit hours. Students will be assigned an academic adviser that will likely set up a graduation plan to determine how long it will take to finish their degree.

For example…..

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Topics: college, ncaa, college baseball, college baseball recruiting, college baseball scholarship, naia, njcaa, academic eligibility, credit hours

Kevin Hussey | Sep 18, 2014 10:29:55 AM

College Baseball Recruiting - As Simple as an Email

For those who plan on playing collegiate baseball in the United States, it’s important to understand the college baseball recruiting process and how simple it can be to get on the radar of coaches. Some people believe that in order to get a scholarship as a Canadian player, you need to attend showcases or hit .500 while your travel team visits the US multiple times a year. The truth is you can get the recruiting process started just by sending an email to a coach. Many of the smaller programs in the United States don’t have a recruiting budget that allows coaches to travel like they want, so they rely heavily on student athletes coming to them.

It’s best to contact college coaches as early as possible after you’ve made the decision you want to play baseball in the US. The earlier you contact a coach, the more likely it is they have scholarship money available for you. Coaches would like to get the majority of their recruiting finished early in the year so they can focus more on the upcoming season. Having said this, even though it’s best to start making contact with coaches as soon as possible, colleges are always looking for players. Sometimes coaches are scrambling before the start of the school year to fill a roster spot and every year there are athletes who benefit from this. So it is never "too late" to try.

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Topics: recruiting, ncaa, college baseball recruiting, college recruiting strategy, naia

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